Tank Raised Tinc Tads

Discussion in 'Eggs, Tadpoles & Breeding' started by frogfreak, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Here's a pic of the tank. There's a very small water feature (if you want to call it that) up front. The original idea here was for this to look like the waters edge and hopefully keep flies in. It works for the most part.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a view of the left side from the top.

    [​IMG]

    The right side from the top.

    [​IMG]

    And a pic of a tad in the water. There are around 5 in there right now.

    [​IMG]

    We saw a froglet morph out of this water about a week or so ago. I had Boabab/Jeremy over and he noticed a froglet way up top on a brom. We managed to pull him. Jeremy noticed another on the viv floor. He was able to get that one. This viv holds Bakuis and I have had nothing but SLS from these guys until recently. These two froglets morphed out just fine with no help from Laura or I. I'd like to add that they are the best/largest froglets of the ones we have so far. We have Alanis tads in the tanks to the left of this one and Azureus tads inw to the right.

    I am AMAZED that they can do so well, in such a tiny amount of water, with no food supplimenting from us. We see zero aggression between the tadpoles. They are all different ages/size.

    Comments?
     
  2. Grimm

    Grimm Contributing Member

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    All I can say is...Freakin awesome! I love the thought of the entire tad/froglet cycle taking place inside a tank with no human help. I hope someday I can be lucky enough!

    Is the water stagnant? Do you do frequent water changes?
     
  3. crimson

    crimson Member

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    Wow , awesome setup . Really interresting building , thanks ......many new idea for my next Vivarium !!!
     
  4. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Thanks man

    The water is stagnant, it is clear though. I have no idea what's going on here. That's why I posted this. When we do a water change it's around half the water. We haven't done a change in a month or so.

    Here is where I get really confused...

    What up with all the "Growth inhibiting hormones" I here about? Why aren't they effecting the tads?

    We did a new communal tank a while back in a 5.5g. It turned out to be a friggin disaster. The first two froglets had SLS and the last two are still tads and they went into the water July 24th. Some seriously weird looking tads...
     
  5. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Merci Crimson

    J'aime l'eau dans le réservoir pour de nombreuses raisons, mais nous n'attendions pas ce .. :)
     
  6. dewit

    dewit Member

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    i love the tank setups you guys have at home :x .....pretty jealous....and happy i was lucky enough to see them in person, and also the little tads, wish i would have seen one of those froglets though:p....and your 2 tads from july are kinda weird....a funny shape too, i did read a couple post on dendroboard about tadpoles living for about 3 years like that. strange little alien looking things:p
     
  7. DJ

    DJ Contributing Member

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    I had a fair number of E. anthonyi (tricolors) raised in the small stagnant pool (about the same size as yours Glenn) in a 20 gal viv that I had going for about half a dozen years. Probably raised up 10 or 15 froglets, all which were normal and healthy. Having said that I also know that I had way more tads that were deposited and then "disappeared" in the same pool. At times there were at least 10 tads in the pool at once and I was too lazy to pull them. Lots of tannins were in the water and at times there was more mulm and detritus than there was free swimming water for them to move around in. For the ones that morphed out, I'm not sure why their growth wasn't inhibited except that because the pool is continuous with the false bottom of the tank there were lots of plant roots and presumable a ton of bacteria that might break down the wastes and/or hormones that are responsible for the problems that typically occur in a closed system like a Tupperware container.

    It's pretty cool to have the whole life cycle going on in one tank that's for sure!
     
  8. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Thanks for the reply!

    I am very curious as to what is going on. It doesn't bother me if 20 go in and 5 come out, but I haven't seen that yet. Something is different about this and I'm not sure what it is. Why, in such a tiny space are they not showing signs of growth inhibiting hormones?

    Merci pour la réponse!

    Je suis très curieux de savoir ce qui se passe. Il ne me dérange pas si 20 aller et 5 sortira, mais je n'ai pas encore vu. Quelque chose est différente à ce sujet et je ne suis pas sûr de ce qu'il est. Pourquoi, dans un espace minuscule sont-ils pas des signes d'hormones inhibant la croissance?
     
  9. syble

    syble Contributing Member

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    i tried that with my yellow galacts, didnt work out so well for me. They are fine in community on the outside in a big sweater box, but in the tank they ate each other and when they finally morph out they have sls. I get healthy ones from the ones i raise though.
    Sib ;)
     
  10. Malli

    Malli Contributing Member

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    Wow! Really cool Glenn and Laura :)
     
  11. greenoasis1

    greenoasis1 Contributing Member

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    Glen,

    I don't think it's the amount of space but the number of tads in one body of water that you will then notice growth inhibiting hormones.
    If there is a fight for food and space the larger tads will release the inhibiting hormones so they will morph out first then the next larger tads will do the same, in the wild if the body of water is temporary it's a race to morph out first before it dries up.
    I guess it would also be an advantage to have smaller weaker tads become food for the stronger tads.

     
    Corvidael likes this.
  12. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Thanks for all the responses!

    This is my guess, based on what I've read here and what I'm thinking. The tank is well aged and there is a lot of algae/dead flies/springs and whatnot in that water. We see no aggression and watch big tads and small ones grazing on the rocks and glass. They will pass each other and just keep on grazing like there's nothing there. Like bottom feeders in a fish tank. So, the food thing is probably the answer. There's a constant natural, neverending food source, so there's not competition and no growth inhibiting hormones excreted.

    Merci pour toutes ces réponses!

    C'est ma proposition, fondée sur ce que j'ai lu ici et ce que je pense. Le réservoir est bien vieilli et il ya beaucoup d'algues / mouches mortes / ressorts et tout le reste dans cette eau. Nous ne voyons aucune agression et de regarder tads petits et grands pâturages celles sur les rochers et le verre. Ils passeront les uns les autres et continuez sur le pâturage comme il n'y a rien. Comme les poissons de fond dans un aquarium. Donc, la chose la nourriture est probablement la réponse. Il ya une constante naturelle, interminable source de nourriture, il n'y a donc pas de la concurrence et sans hormones de croissance inhibant excrétée.

    Glenn
     
  13. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    I'd like to hear more about how your tank was set up.

    Thanks

    J'aimerais en savoir plus sur la façon dont votre réservoir a été mis en place.

    Merci

    Glenn
     
  14. syble

    syble Contributing Member

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    Its the same tank they've been in since i got theme, there are a couple deli container ponds with pebbles, algae, and the whole lot, just like yours. Parents would transport the tads, and only ever see one in a pool, even though i'd see them transport newbies in. So needless to say i pulled all further eggs, but i left the assorted inhabitants in there to finish cycle, all of them had sls, i tried a couple of batches, some i left to nature, others i suplemented food, all ended up with sls. Meanwhile their counterparts on the outside have developed fine. the only thing i can guess is there is a higher temperature swing in there compared to out here?

    The ones in the sweater box have a sprig or 2 of pothos, and all the snail eggs they can eat aswell as algae. every once and a while i give them a pinch of powdered bloodworm or spirulina, but not often, i dont usually change the water, i just top it off. As they get to be mature, they pick a spot as theirs but never had them fight, or eat/kill each other.


    Sib ;)
     
  15. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Thanks Sib

    What about in the wild? The temperature swings in the wild would be more extreme, no? Did you have hides in the cups? The rocks in our tanks allow them to stake out a territory. I'm thinking about doing this on a larger scale and am just trying to get as many comments from people, as I can. Phil had a very good point about the amount of tads in the water.


    Merci Sib

    Qu'en est-il dans la nature? Les variations de température dans la nature serait plus extrêmes, non? Avez-vous se cache dans les tasses? Les roches dans nos bacs de leur permettre de jalonner un territoire. Je pense à le faire à plus grande échelle et je suis juste essayer d'obtenir autant de commentaires de gens, que je peux. Phil avait un très bon point sur le montant des maladies animales transfrontières dans l'eau.
     
  16. syble

    syble Contributing Member

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    there were pebbles that they could stake out a spot like you said. i'm thinking the smaller body of water might cool off more. vs. the large bin which would take longer to warm up and longer to cool off.
    Sib
     
  17. boabab95

    boabab95 Contributing Member

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    HAHA glad I could help glenn...just remember...I called them...HAHAHAHAHA


    I seem to remember about a year ago reading that the growth inhibiting hormones were only used by either a certain species, or in certain part of SA that dries out quicker(giving the tadpole a small window to morph.) I can't remember which it was and I don't have a link, sadly...

    either way, I'm glad I not only got to see them in person, but that they FINALLY morphed out without SLS...


    just my .02
     
  18. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Here we go...

    We picked up a 75g and have attached the cork bark. Between the cork bark will be a clay mix. I hope it works out well...The plan is to have 2/3rdsland to 1/3rd water. We have some Sub Adult Powders and Pats that we can add. We will add 2.1 max, maybe a pair. I'm very curious if this will be successful. I'm liking the idea of raisng them in the Viv. :)

    [​IMG]

    We will update as we go along...

    Oh....Any ideas for the top? We want to put 4 misting nozzles in there and 2 fans at the back. I'm thinking about spliting the glass in half going the length of the tank. There would then be 4 pieces of glass because of the center support. That would put the misters about 6-8 inches from the background and give us 9 inches to get in from the top. 6-8 inches sounds to close to me...

    Thoughts anyone? Pics of these kinds of setups would be appreciated.
     
  19. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

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    Like I didn't need anymore motivation to build this tank...

    I just walked in, looked our Leuc tank and found this. :D

    [​IMG]

    To coooooool!
     
  20. dewit

    dewit Member

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    wow thats awesome glenn...one day i hope to find those in one of my tanks :p ..... what kinda of clay are you planning on using for the background on the 75g?
     

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