Jumping Bristletails (Archaeognatha)

Discussion in 'Food & Feeding' started by Gll_Nye, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. Gll_Nye

    Gll_Nye Member

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    Sometimes I find these strange looking insects in my backyard. They are very similar to silverfish. So looked them up and found that it's what is known as a jumping bristletail. Of the order: Archaeognatha. Which belongs to the same subclass of insects that silverfish and firebrats belong to. Wikipedia says "They feed primarily on algae, but also lichens, and mosses, or decaying organic materials." I've now had it living in my moss growing tank for a couple of weeks and it seems to be doing well! I was going to try and find a few more and try to start culturing them. Thoughts on this? In further reading I found some species (maybe only arboreal species) can glide through the air. And there's this neat video. https://canopyants.net/research/gliding-arthropods/bristletail-videos/ I guess because they are so primitive scientists are looking at these to understand how flight in insects might have evolved. Haven't tested if mine glides haha. Anyway...
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  2. mystah

    mystah Legendary Member

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    would be interested to see how this goes...good luck
     
  3. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Member

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    Hmmm, I haven't seen those around in my bug hunts in the lower mainland. I'd be interested in trying a few in my terrariums.
     
  4. Ron Jung

    Ron Jung Contributing Member

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    Read up on them they have an 8 N star before fully mature to breed and this can take up to 2 years from what I have read so may not be a viable food source due to duration of time from nymph to breeding adult. This was just a fast check there maybe more info out there but just throwing this out for people interested.
     
  5. Gll_Nye

    Gll_Nye Member

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    Hi Ron perhaps you are right. I have read that silverfish reach maturity at the 6th instar which can take between 3 months to 2 years depending on environment conditions. If conditions are right will reach maturity at between 3-4 months. Similar may be true for the jumping bristletails. I have not researched much either so just speculating here as well. I was thinking because of their diet they may function as tank janitors similar to springtails and isopods.
     
  6. Ron Jung

    Ron Jung Contributing Member

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    Yes they might be great for tank cleaners but from what I read they may not be viable for a food source. Since you have some can't hurt to give them a try and if you do please let us know how they work.

    Ron.
     
  7. Gll_Nye

    Gll_Nye Member

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    Here about Neomachilellus scandens. "A dry forest floor induces hatching, and the larvae develop rapidly, requiring only three months to reach maturity." And Petrobius brevistylis "Larval development requires three and a half months." i guess they are saying larvae instead of nymphs. So development rate differs between species but I think many species develop within a period of months not years.

    A lot of interesting info on them here tho.

    http://www.encyclopedia.com/environ...anscripts-and-maps/microcoryphia-bristletails


    Still only have the one of these probably wont see any again till summer months. Anyway I'll give it a shot breeding them and report back here with findings.[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Gll_Nye

    Gll_Nye Member

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    ...If I ever do end up finding more.
     

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